A Research Institute on Canadian / Latin American & Caribbean Relations.

A Research Institute on Canadian / Latin American & Caribbean Relations.

• To promote knowledge and raise mutual understanding between the peoples and governments of Canada, Latin America and the Caribbean.
Read More
Advocates mutual respect, social justice, sovereignty, solidarity, dialogue, cooperation and sustainable development.

Advocates mutual respect, social justice, sovereignty, solidarity, dialogue, cooperation and sustainable development.

• We envision relations between Canada and the Latin American and Caribbean region based on mutual respect, social justice, sovereignty, solidarity, dialogue, cooperation and sustainable development.
Read More
Stands for Social Justice, Peace, Democracy and People’s Self-determination, All Human Rights and Environmental Sustainability.

Stands for Social Justice, Peace, Democracy and People’s Self-determination, All Human Rights and Environmental Sustainability.

• We work to influence foreign policies and public opinion, disseminate accurate information, carry out research and promote exchanges between writers, social movements, indigenous peoples and researchers.
Read More
Focuses on People, Knowledge, Communications, Advocacy, Media Monitoring and Outreach Communities.

Focuses on People, Knowledge, Communications, Advocacy, Media Monitoring and Outreach Communities.

• Our activities aim at generating and sharing knowledge, and promoting understanding, positive policies and cooperation. We counterbalance biases and inaccuracies, and establish partnerships and networks.
Read More
Carries out Research, Studies, Media Analysis, Electoral Accompaniment, and produce Accurate Information.

Carries out Research, Studies, Media Analysis, Electoral Accompaniment, and produce Accurate Information.

• We carry out research, studies and exchanges among scholars, writers and social activists, monitor and analyse media reporting, accompany electoral processes, inform policy decision-makers, advisors, analysts, organizations and the public, disseminate accurate information on political, social, environmental and economic issues and progressive accomplishments.
Read More

Notre mission et nos valeurs

Le Centre de Politiques Canadien, Amerique latine & Caraïbes (CAL&C)  est un insti...

Conseil d’administration

CAL&C est régie par un conseil de douze administrateurs qui contribuent leurs compéten...

Nos Partenaires

Notre travail consiste à la contribution et les efforts de collaboration d'autres organisa...

Nos bailleurs de fonds

Notre travail est l'expression du désir de millions de personnes à travers l'hémisphère at...

Donate | Faire un don | Dona

Help transform the relations between Canada and Latin America and the Caribbean to promote knowledge and understanding, based on mutual respect, social justice, self-determination, cooperation and sustainable development. Make a one-time donation or become a monthly supporting Donor.

Projects

EleKtora

Plate-forme électronique pour analyser le comportement électoral en Amérique latine et dans les Caraïbes, et au Canada. ...

Index de tous les droits de l’homme

Analyse, classification et rang de tous les droits humains au Canada et en Amérique latine et dans les Caraïbes.

Observatoire des médias

Plate-forme électronique pour analyser le comportement électoral en Amérique latine et dans les Caraïbes, et au Canada. ...

Recherche

Projets de recherche, d'études et d'échanger des idées, parmi les savants, les écrivains et les militants sociaux.

Latest News

27
Juil

Entretien avec Maria Victor par RCI (en espagnol): « Les Etats-Unis cherchent à reprendre le pétrole vénézuélien »

RCI - Radio Canada Internacional Rufo Valencia | amlat@rcinet.ca Miércoles 26 julio, 2017 Centre de Politiques Canadien, Amerique latine & Caraïbes a récemment publié un article intitulé « L'oppo...
10
Juil

La crise du Venezuela avec Maria Paez Victor.

The Ossington Circle Episode 21 sur la crise du Venezuela avec Maria Paez Victor. Dans cet épisode, Justin Podur parle à Maria Paez Victor du Centre de Politiques Canadien, Amerique latine & Ca...

CAL&C Policy Centre commends The Star for publishing article by Linda McQuaig on Venezuela.

In a letter to The Star, Dr. Maria Páez Victor, Chair of the Board of the Canadian, Latin American and Caribbean Policy Centre, commended the Canadian newspaper for publishing an article by Linda McQuaig on Venezuela.

On behalf of the Canadian, Latin American and Caribbean Policy Centre, we wish to commend The Star for publishing today’s article by Linda McQuaig on Venezuela.
https://www.thestar.com/opinion/star-columnists/2018/03/15/canada-on-wrong-side-of-venezuelan-conflict.html.

It is a source of great frustration to those of us who have first hand knowledge and experience in Latin America to see that overwhelmingly the news that Canadian media publish on Venezuela comes through the biased news agencies of the USA, thereby negating a Canadian view of the political and social situations that arise in Latin America.

Specifically, with respect to Venezuela – that has the largest oil deposit in this Hemisphere- there is a clear and open attempt by the Trump Adminstration to effect “regime change” there, precisely to obtain control of its oil resources. It is a country that is clearly democratic . Its next presidential election are on 20 May, as agreed with the opposition. The Venezuelan electoral process has been hailed by former USA president Jimmy Carter as the best in the world. Its economic woes are due less to government policies as to a confessed and concerted action by the USA to bring down its economy, similar to the assault that Chile underwent when Nixon and Kissinger vowed to “make Chile’s economy scream” before they orchestrated the coup that killed Allende.

It is more than sad that Canada, under Minister C. Freelan has chosen to engage in regime change with its sanctions against Venezuela that are a violation of international law, rather than the long standing Canadian tradition not to interfere in the domestic policies of other nations.

It is most refreshing to see an article well written, well researched such as that of Linda McQuaig. If you have any doubts as to the veracity of her column, we are most prepared to meet with you and provide ample evidential data that will corroborate her words.

Most sincerely,

Dr. Maria Páez Victor
Chair of the Board
The Canadian, Latin American and Caribbean Policy Centre
www.calcentre.ca

Linda McQuaig: Canada’s Venezuela sanctions inflict hardship, endorse right wing elite

By: Linda McQuaig For Metro Published on Wed Mar 14 2018

What’s going on in Venezuela is a bitter class war, writes Linda McQuaig.

In terms of foreign policy damage, whatever harm Justin Trudeau did by parading around India in colourful outfits is a nothing-burger compared to the severe hardship he is inflicting on Venezuela.

And yet media commentators have been full-throttle in denouncing the prime minister’s alleged wardrobe malfunction on his recent India trip while being silent – or downright supportive – of Trudeau’s decision last fall to join the Trump administration in imposing sanctions on the struggling South American nation.

Anyone following the international media coverage would conclude that the Venezuelan government is terribly autocratic and that Western nations, led by the U.S., have stepped in with sanctions out of concern over human rights abuses there.

A closer look suggests a different scenario that puts Western actions in a less laudable light: Washington is waging economic war against a nation that dared to rise up and reject U.S. control over its ample oil reserves.

The Obama administration targeted individual Venezuelans with sanctions, but the Trump administration’s sanctions are much broader, taking punishing aim at the country’s entire economy.

Sadly, Trudeau is backing up the U.S. bully, apparently hoping to win a reprieve from Trump’s arbitrary trade measures – a strategy that seems unfair to Venezuela and also likely futile. We’ll return to Canada’s sorry role in this saga in a moment.

Venezuela has been in Washington’s cross hairs ever since the dramatic 1998 election of Hugo Chavez, a charismatic, populist leader – and this is one case where the word “populist” legitimately applies.

Unlike the “populist” Donald Trump, Chavez actually came from humble beginnings — his roots are Afro-Indigenous — and he actually championed his country’s large peasant population.

Indeed, unlike many Third World leaders who siphon off their nation’s wealth in cahoots with foreign multinationals and local elites, Chavez enraged Washington by nationalizing Venezuela’s oil and redirecting the wealth to health care, education, housing and food for the poor.

Venezuela’s wealthy elite, angry about losing their privileged position, vowed to overthrow Chavez – and briefly did in a violent 2002 coup, with the help of Washington, before being repelled two days later when hundreds of thousands of pro-Chavez demonstrators from poor neighbourhoods took to the streets of Caracas.

Many in the elite had worked for the U.S.-owned oil industry when it effectively ran the oil-rich nation. And, like the Cuban elite after Fidel Castro nationalized U.S.-owned industry there, the Venezuelan elite has remained close to Washington.

After the failed 2002 coup, Venezuela’s elite concentrated on demonizing Chavez – and Nicolas Maduro, his hand-picked successor, who narrowly won election following Chavez’s death from cancer in 2013.

Although lacking Chavez’s charisma, Maduro has continued to win elections even as the country’s economy has plunged, along with world oil prices. Frustrated, the opposition has adopted increasingly violent tactics – including a bizarre attack last year when rebels dropped grenades from a helicopter on the country’s Supreme Court.

Alfred de Zayas, a UN-appointed expert sent to investigate the chaos last fall, met with dozens of opposition activists as well as church and human rights groups, and concluded that the Maduro regime has made “major mistakes including excessive force by the police.”

But de Zayas also found that popular support for the Chavez revolution remains strong. And he accused anti-government demonstrators of having “attacked hospitals, nursery schools, burned ambulances and buses in order to intimidate the people. Is this not classic terrorism?”

The UN expert also explained that the sanctions – which he considers reminiscent of U.S. measures against Chile’s Salvador Allende in the 1970s – are aggravating the suffering of Venezuelans, and he called for them to end. “That would be the greatest help,” he said.

But Canada refuses to listen. Our sanctions aren’t as broad as Trump’s, but they lend Canadian credibility to penalizing Venezuela, thereby providing political cover for the harsh U.S. measures.

And so we continue to inflict sanctions on Venezuela, citing the lofty goal of defending human rights – even while we actively trade and sell arms to full-fledged dictatorships, such as Saudi Arabia.

What’s going on in Venezuela is a bitter class war, with millions of poor people committed to defending a revolution carried out in their name, and Canada taking the side of the wealthy, well-armed opposition.

Linda McQuaig interviewed Hugo Chavez in Caracas in 2004 for a book she wrote on the geopolitics of oil.

http://www.metronews.ca/views/2018/03/14/linda-mcquaig-canada-s-venezuela-sanctions-inflict-hardship-endorse-right-wing-elite.html

Conference: What is Really At Stake in Venezuela by Maria Páez Victor

Conference: What is Really At Stake in Venezuela by Maria Páez Victor
Maria Páez Victor
Chair of the Board of Directors
Canadian, Latin American and Caribbean Policy Centre
Wednesday, April 4, 7:30 pm
The Spire (conference room)
82 Sydenham Street

Se gradúa la primera mujer de la Universidad Indígena

por AlbaTV

Yamosewe Algentina García, 26 años, del pueblo Ye’kwana, es la primera mujer que se gradúa de la Universidad Nacional Experimental Indígena del Tauca, con un trabajo de investigación sobre el rol protagónico de la mujer en su comunidad Jüwütünña (Santa María de Erebato, Alto Caura).

Ella y otros compañeros de estudios (de los pueblos Ye’kwana, Wotjuja, E’ñepá y Pumé) estuvieron presentando sus trabajos de tesis en los pasados días, en la sede caraqueña de la Fundación Causa Amerindia Kiwxi. Este acto de intercambio de conocimiento ha contado con la presencia de figuras de comprobada trayectoria académica, siendo ésto un requisito del Ministerio del Poder Popular para la Educación Universitaria, Ciencia y Tecnología. Sin embargo, el evento ha sido antecedido por otro de aún mayor relevancia: la presentación de sus procesos de investigación en sus respectivas comunidades, ante las sabias y los sabios.

La comunidad, principio y fin de la formación

La presentación en su comunidad posee una importancia crucial: porque son las comunidades indígenas las verdaderas protagonistas de este proyecto educativo. « La legitimación de la actividad educativa indígena proviene de las bases comunitarias » es de hecho uno de los principios rectores de esta universidad.

Son las comunidades quienes impulsan la Universidad, para que sus jóvenes estudien y profundicen la conciencia y el conocimiento de sus propias raíces culturales, comprendiendo con respecto la de las otras culturas, para elaborar un pensamiento indígena propio. Eso, con el fin de fortalecer sus pueblos y sus culturas frente a los cambios, peligros y retos que conlleva la contemporaneidad.

El trabajo de investigación de Yamosewe tiene como finalidad aportar al fortalecimiento de su comunidad a través de un mayor protagonismo de las mujeres en las tomas de decisiones y en la visibilización de su importancia para la vida de la comunidad.

La realidad de las mujeres Ye’kwana hoy

« La mujer es la madre de una comunidad entera. Ella da la vida al pueblo Ye’kwana, es quien permite la vida en la comunidad. Produce los alimentos desde el conuco, elabora la comida, dirige las actividades en la comunidad. Es quien cuida y atiende las necesidades de su pueblo, su comunidad y su familia. Carga la leña, hace artesanía propia para producir lo que se necesita » afirma Yamosewe en su presentación, haciendo incapié en que de las mujeres Ye’kwana depende la seguridad alimentaria y la salud de su familia y de la comunidad.

« Sin embargo, las voces y opiniones de la mujer Ye’kwana han sido invisibilizadas ante la comunidad y el mundo «de afuera» » explica Yamosewe. « Las mujeres tienen mucho que aportar y su valor dentro de la comunidad hoy es poco nombrado. Las dificultades que la comunidad Ye’kwana sufre en estos días se deben precisamente al hecho que la mujer esté al margen de la decisiones que toma la comunidad ».

« La relación del hombre y la mujer Ye’kwana se ha desorientado en los últimos años en la comunidad Ye’kwana y fuera de ella » sostiene. Para ello, rescata el valor y rol de la mujer Ye’kwana representado en la mitología y cosmovisión de su pueblo, trasmitida de forma oral, analizando al mismo tiempo la situación actual a través de conversas con ancianas, ancianos y lideresas de su comunidad. Su trabajo responde a la necesidad de poder resaltar las voces de las mujeres de su comunidad, para que sean « las mismas mujeres de la comunidad [quienes] expresen sus derechos de vida cultural y territorial ».

Según relata Yamosewe, también existen casos de maltrato y violencia hacia las mujeres Ye’kwana en sus propias comunidades, sin embargo « los derechos escritos de las mujeres de este país también han confundido a la mujer Ye`kwana, ya que esta ley[1] no habla de una mujer comunitaria si no de una mujer individual ». Es por eso que para su labor de investigación, ha encontrado mayor correspondencia en las reflexiones de las mujeres indígenas Aymara y de las mujeres zapatistas.

También enumera algunos factores externos que están afectando directamente la vida de las mujeres, como la presencia de grupos armados y la minería, la cual « afecta directamente a la mujer, porque se ha empezado a ver casos de prostitución, enfermedades, tráfico de drogas. La salud se encuentra también amenazada, nuestros ríos contaminados por el uso de mercurio, por tercero y por los mismo Ye’kwana ».

Un trabajo de autoinvestigación

Yamosewe es una de las dos jóvenes que iniciaron a estudiar en la Universidad Indígena en 2009, cuando luego de un proceso de reflexión y debate se empieza a plantear el ingreso de las mujeres como estudiantes. El trabajo de investigación parte de sus propias vivencias e interrogantes. « Pensé que en la Universidad Indígena habían otras muchachas, pero no habían. Entonces empecé a hacerme preguntas sobre eso, y sobre algunas frases que escuchaba, en boca de los mismos coordinadores: frases como «la mujer genera problemas en esta institución», «las mujeres aquí hacen desastres» o «las mujeres distraen a los otros estudiantes». Pero finalmente ya se entendió que las mujeres también tienen derecho a estudiar ».

« Al principio me ha costado mucho este trabajo. Porque en mi comunidad parecía no haber nadie que se preocupara para que la voz de la mujer se escuche, tanto en la comunidad como afuera. Porque la mujer Ye’kwana no manifiesta sus problemas hacia afuera » admite.

Yamosewe cuenta que recibió el apoyo de las ancianas y los ancianos de su comunidad, y también de las mujeres de su comunidad: « en las conversaciones que fueron parte de mi trabajo, me di cuenta que compartíamos las mismas inquietudes. Me di cuenta que no estaba sola, que las mujeres quieren ser escuchadas. No estudiamos porque otros no quieren que lo hagamos. Por eso tenemos dificultades a expresarnos y a participar en las reuniones ».

El derecho de las mujeres a estudiar, además de las labores de las cuales se ocupa tradicionalmente, es uno de los temas surgidos de las conversas. Ello, en aras de aportar a la participación protagónica de las mujeres de la comunidad, lo cual lleva a su vez al fortalecimiento de la comunidad y a una mayor organización para hacer frente, por ejemplo, a problemáticas como la minería.

La tesis de Yamosewe también pone en luz la necesidad de reflexionar sobre la construcción de relaciones armoniosas entre hombres y mujeres de la comunidad, a partir de la comprensión recíproca.

Además, resalta la existencia de métodos propios de su cultura « para tratar el carácter de los hombres agresivos », como la utilización de una planta medicinal.

« Este trabajo es para que los jóvenes Ye’kwana abran sus ojos y su camino para los niños y niñas que vienen detrás de nosotros » finaliza. Por su parte las juradas y los jurados afirmaron en su veredicto que se trata de una tesis inédita, que puede generar reflexiones enriquecedoras y representa un aporte valioso no sólo para el pueblo Ye’kwana y para la Universidad Indígena, sino también para Venezuela entera.

La Universidad Indígena del Tauca

La Universidad Indígena del Tauca es el resultado de un largo trayecto que remonta a la década de lo Setenta, cuando empezó a configurarse una red de relaciones e iniciativas entre indígenas y aliados que apuntaba a fortalecer el protagonismo de los pueblos indígenas para su propia supervivencia.

Con el proceso constituyente de 1999 promovido por el Presidente Chávez, en el cual participan activamente representantes de organizaciones indígenas, por primera vez se logra el reconocimiento de los derechos de los pueblos originarios y de sus reivindicaciones de carácter legislativo. Como escribió uno de los integrantes del equipo que promovió la fundación de la Universidad: « si en algún momento, el proyecto de Universidad de y para los indígenas llego a ser una simple utopía; la existencia y el reconocimiento de un marco legal como el referido, deja bien explícita la posibilidad real para que Venezuela tenga una Universidad Indígena. »[2]

Es así como, a finales de 1999, es fundada la Universidad Indígena de Venezuela (UIV), por organizaciones indígenas con el acompañamiento de la fundación Causa Amerindia Kiwxi. Su sede, en Caño Tauca (estado Bolívar) se convierte en un importante punto de encuentro debido a su ubicación en el corazón del país, en la confluencia del Río Caura y el eje vial Ciudad Bolívar – Caicara del Orinoco, dos de las principales vías de comunicación empleadas por los indígenas venezolanos.

En noviembre de 2008 el presidente Chávez ordena el reconocimiento de la UIV para su inclusión dentro del sistema nacional de Universidades, que se concretiza en 2010, cuando es reinaugurada como « Universidad Nacional Experimental Indígena del Tauca »junto con otra sede fundada en el estado Amazonas[3].

Este proyecto educativo se plantea como un espacio de educación pluricultural, de construcción y rescate colectivo del pensamiento indígena y la formación de hombres y mujeres para que sean líderes y multiplicadores en sus comunidades. Una universidad propia, de los pueblos indígenas, para los pueblos indígenas, bajo una perspectiva decolonial.

Noam Chomsky y otros activistas piden a EEUU y Canadá que levanten sanciones contra Venezuela

por Agencias

El escritor estadounidense Noam Chomsky, el actor Danny Glover y otras personalidades firmaron una carta pública para pedir a los gobiernos de Estados Unidos y Canadá que levanten las sanciones contra el gobierno del presidente Nicolás Maduro en Venezuela., reseña la agencia Reuters.

Los dos activistas de alto perfil son parte de un grupo de 154 personas que considera que las medidas castigan a los más pobres del país sudamericano y no contribuyen al diálogo político para aliviar una aguda crisis.

La misiva se conoce cuando en Estados Unidos fuentes dicen que el gobierno de Donald Trump considera profundizar las sanciones que hasta ahora afectan a un puñado de funcionarios venezolanos, entre ellos Maduro, y elevar las restricciones económicas para evitar cualquier alivio financiero a un gobierno que considera una dictadura.

Canadá también aplicó sanciones a funcionarios venezolanos.

Los adversarios a Maduro dicen que las sanciones castigan a un gobierno violador de derechos humanos, pero Maduro dice que son parte de un conspiración internacional de derecha que busca derrocarlo y tomar control de la riqueza petrolera de la nación miembro de la OPEP.

“Estamos profundamente preocupados por el uso de sanciones ilegales, cuyo efecto recae más en los sectores pobres y marginados de la sociedad, para coaccionar el cambio político y económico en una democracia hermana”, se lee en la carta.

“Las sanciones simplemente complican los esfuerzos del Vaticano, la República Dominicana y otros actores internacionales para mediar en una resolución a la profunda polarización en Venezuela”, agrega el texto.

El fallecido presidente Hugo Chávez solía disfrutar del apoyo de gobiernos y personalidades de izquierda, entre ellas Chomsky; pero su sucesor Maduro ha perdido respaldo en la comunidad internacional, sobretodo tras los cuatro meses de protestas antigubernamentales que vivió el país el año pasado.

El escritor estadounidense Noam Chomsky, el actor Danny Glover y otras personalidades firmaron una carta pública para pedir a los gobiernos de Estados Unidos y Canadá que levanten las sanciones contra el gobierno del presidente Nicolás Maduro en Venezuela., reseña la agencia Reuters.

Los dos activistas de alto perfil son parte de un grupo de 154 personas que considera que las medidas castigan a los más pobres del país sudamericano y no contribuyen al diálogo político para aliviar una aguda crisis.

La misiva se conoce cuando en Estados Unidos fuentes dicen que el gobierno de Donald Trump considera profundizar las sanciones que hasta ahora afectan a un puñado de funcionarios venezolanos, entre ellos Maduro, y elevar las restricciones económicas para evitar cualquier alivio financiero a un gobierno que considera una dictadura.

Canadá también aplicó sanciones a funcionarios venezolanos.

Los adversarios a Maduro dicen que las sanciones castigan a un gobierno violador de derechos humanos, pero Maduro dice que son parte de un conspiración internacional de derecha que busca derrocarlo y tomar control de la riqueza petrolera de la nación miembro de la OPEP.

“Estamos profundamente preocupados por el uso de sanciones ilegales, cuyo efecto recae más en los sectores pobres y marginados de la sociedad, para coaccionar el cambio político y económico en una democracia hermana”, se lee en la carta.

“Las sanciones simplemente complican los esfuerzos del Vaticano, la República Dominicana y otros actores internacionales para mediar en una resolución a la profunda polarización en Venezuela”, agrega el texto.

El fallecido presidente Hugo Chávez solía disfrutar del apoyo de gobiernos y personalidades de izquierda, entre ellas Chomsky; pero su sucesor Maduro ha perdido respaldo en la comunidad internacional, sobretodo tras los cuatro meses de protestas antigubernamentales que vivió el país el año pasado.

We stand for...

- Social Justice - Justicia Social
-Justice sociale
- Advocacy - Promoción
-Promotion
- Global Solidarity - Solidaridad Global
-Solidarité mondiale
- Equality - Igualdad
-Égalité
- Sovereignty - Soberanía
-Souveraineté